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BRAINTRAINED BY DOMINATORS

Chain stores are stores that are related to each other and usually have a single central buying office. The chains are important to publishers because the top five chains control one-third of the bookstore market for $3.2 billion in sales. So, five buyers control one-third of the books.
- Dan Poynter

You have to look for the publications that aren't owned. Half a dozen corporations control most of the content of cable. It doesn't matter if there are 500 stations. Vladimir Pozner used to be in the Soviet media. He said, "We had more daily newspapers in Moscow than you have in New York City. We had all these different magazines, but they all came from one owner, the Communist Party and the state." That's what we are approaching here: five owners or so and they're owning all of these different channels. - Jeff Cohen

In 1996 the American Booksellers Association published these survey results:

58% of the adult U.S.

80% of U.S. families did not buy or read a book in the past year.

70% of U.S. adults have not been in a bookstore in the last five years.

42% of college graduates never read another book after graduation.

Dan Poynter, Book Marketing, Para Publishing 2000

The prose demanded by the middle class is preeminently that of institutional advertising... [suggesting] the indispensability of cliche to middle class understanding. Where the more fortunately educated read to be surprised, the middle class reads to have its notions confirmed, and deviations from customary verbal formulas disconcert and annoy it.
- Paul Fussel

Symbols are all that is left...[psychoactive] plants of any sort have disappeared, and in their place are esoteric teachings and dogma, rituals, stress on lineages, gestures, and cosmogonic diagrams. Today's major world religions are typical of this stage...another stage [is]...the complete abandonment of even the pretense of remembering the felt experience of the mystery. This last stage is typified by secular scientism as perfected in the twentieth century...in the process of abandonment: the rediscovery of the mystery and its interpretation as evil and threatening to social values. - Terrance McKenna

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